VMware – NSX and Cisco ACI

There is not really much I can add to the debate on NSX vs ACI except to share my opinion on a few things.

Let’s look at the world as it is today.  It is a virtual world.  At least 80% of workloads in most datacenters today are virtualized. So that leaves roughly 20% of workloads as physical.  How often do physical workloads move to different servers, racks, datacenters etc?  Not very often right?  You rack them, you cable them, you plug them in, you configure the port(s) and that is basically where it lives for the rest of it days.  Any rules or policies you need for those machines get created and that’s it.

Continue reading “VMware – NSX and Cisco ACI”

VMware NSX – What is with the Cisco or NSX debate?

Why is there a perception that you can use Cisco or NSX?  If you perform a simple google search you will find many articles that aim to answer the question of Cisco vs. NSX?  This is like saying HP or vSPhere?  It doesn’t make any sense.  Cisco and NSX can co-exist in a datacenter it’s not a one or the other proposition.  Let’s face it Cisco owns the network layer in most datacenters and they should, they make damn good networking hardware.  But that’s just it.  They make hardware much like HP, Dell, and IBM make hardware.  It has limitations.

Don’t get me wrong hardware is a necessary evil for obvious reasons for all types of  virtualization whether it be computer, networking, or storage.  I just don’t understand the big debate regarding Cisco vs. NSX.  It’s really very simple.  Keep your existing Cisco hardware and get more out of it with NSX.  I hear many making an argument that network virtualization is not needed because you cannot consolidate multiple switches or routers into one.  This baffles me as well.  If you support this argument or feel it is valid you don’t understand the value of Network virtualization

Continue reading “VMware NSX – What is with the Cisco or NSX debate?”

VMware announces two new open source offers Project Lightwave & Photon!

Today VMware announced two new projects which it will release as open source.  Project lightwave is a standards-based, enterprise-grade, identity and access management service targeting critical security, governance, and compliance challenges for cloud-native apps. Project Lightwave supports industry-standard authentication protocols such as Kerberos, LDAP, SAML, and X.509, making interoperability with existing identities and identity providers possible. Support for certificate and key management can be managed using Project Lightwave as well.

Also announced today is another open sourced project named Photon.  Project Photon is an ultra lightweight linux distribution specifically deigned for running containers.  VMware announced support for Dockers ,rkt, and Garden with a minimal footprint of 300MB.  Photon will be available in all the usual places you would expect to find open source VM images such as Vagrant.

The two projects will be released with native integrations and Lightwave will run directly on Photon.  Linux containers are quickly becoming the norm these days and VMware is demonstrating it’s commitment to keep with the times and support these emerging technologies.

Additional reading:

http://blogs.vmware.com/vsphere/2015/04/run-containers-vsphere-project-photon-project-lightwave.html

https://blogs.vmware.com/cloudnative/introducing-photon/

http://blogs.vmware.com/cloudnative/introducing-lightwave/

VMware Remote Console 7.1 for MAC is now available

This is for all you MacBook users out there.  If you are like me and run a VM to use the VMRC console, well those days are over.  VMware Remote Console 7.1 for mac was released yesterday!

Last October, VMware announced the release of the first standalone VMware Remote Console application for Windows.  Yesterday, VMware went live with the first-ever VMware Remote Console (VMRC) for Mac OS.  Until the end of last year, VMRC has been a plug-in component in the web clients of vSphere, vCloud Director, and vRealize Automation.  Until this release of VMRC for Mac, customers on Mac clients were limited to using a basic HTML console and a plugin-based device control.

Google has scheduled the deprecation of the Netscape Plugin API (NPAPI) in Chrome browsers in September 2015, which will stop the legacy VMware Remote Console plug-in in web clients from functioning.  VMware will continue to add VMRC support for different platforms so that customers will have plugin-independent access to VM console functionality and operations, as well as client device connections to VMs on remote ESXi hosts.

VMRC can be launched directly from vSphere web client versions 5.5u2b and 6.0, as well as URLs specifying ESXi host and VM information.  The application supports Mac OS 10.8 and up.

You can find the VMware Remote Console (VMRC) for Mac Download here.