vCloud Automation Center – vCAC 6.0 – Creating an Amazon AWS Endpoint

Creating an Amazon AWS Endpoint is really just assigning the credentials you would like to use to communicate with Amazon. vCAC already knows how to communicate with Amazon, it just doesn’t know what it needs to authenticate. To create the AWS Enpoint perform the following steps:

  1. We start by going to the Infrastructure tab, then choosing Endpoints from the side menu and then Endpoints again. Once there hover over the New Endpoint item on the right side of the page.
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vCloud Automation Center – vCAC 6.0 – Creating Amazon AWS Credentials

Creating an Amazon AWS credential has a few extra steps then a general set of credentials. You will need to login to your AWS account and access your Acess Key Id as well as your Secret Access Key to be utilized in the creation. The steps below outline the process to create an Amazon AWS set of credentials.

1.) Navigate to the Infrastructure tab and select Endpoints form the left Menu then select Credentials.
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2.)The select New Credentials form the right side of the page.
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vCloud Automation Center – vCAC 5.1 – Amazon EC2 Configuration

Usually most people go straight for connecting vCAC to vCenter, but I have decided to connect to Amazon EC2 first. I’m doing this for a few reasons, but mainly because anyone reading this has access to EC2. All you really need is any computer with a Desktop Virtualization tool like VMware workstation and you can test vCAC with Amazon EC2. If you don’t have an Amazon AWWS account go to http://aws.amazon.com and sign-up.

Signing up for Amazon AWS is free and what’s even better is you can also provision “Micro.Instances” for free for an entire year as long as you stay within these guidelines. The basics are this:

  • 750 Hours of Linux/Windows Micro Instance Usage per month. (613Mb Memory). This is enough to run a single micro instance for the whole month.
  • 750 Hours of Elastic Load Balancing plus 15GB of data processing
  • 30GB of Elastic Block Storage
  • 5GB of S3 Storage with 20,000 Get requests and 2,000 Put requests
  • And some other goodies…..

You can run more than one micro instance at a time as long as the consecutive run time of your machines doesn’t go over 750 hours a month. Once you provision an instance it automatically counts as 15 minutes used. I don’t bother trying to calculate by the 15 minutes so the way I look at it is I can perform 750 provisioning tests per month if each test is less than an hour.

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