VMware NSX 6.1.2 for vSphere has been released

If you are currently running NSX for vSphere 6.1 you will be happy to hear that that NSX 6.1.2 for vSphere has been released.  In it is a number of bug fixes that I am particularly happy about.  One fix in particular that I am very happy to see is:

vNICs get ejected because of insufficient ESXi heap memory –  I ran into this in the MoaC Lab and of course it took some time to track down and get resolved.  Aside from being a difficult bug to diagnose it caused secondary issues that were just a pain.  So glad to see this one is taken care of.

Poodle Vulnerability – This release includes an API call that you can use to diable SSL v3 on  specified NSX Edges.

OpenSSL – Has been upgraded to the 101j release

UI Fixes – Not yet sure which ones.

Security Group Parallel Creation  – has been added.  This should help in the over time it takes to deploy App Services in vRealize Automation.

VPN Fixes – I’m not sure on what these fixes are, but I hope there is a fix for OSPF updates over Layer2 VPN.  I will surely let you know once I find out.

There is more details on the the NSX for vSphere 6.1.2 release in the release notes.

You can also find the download here.

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VMware NSX 6.1 for vSphere – Deploying Logical Distributed Routers

In this walk-through we will be deploying a logical router and configuring routing between (2) logical networks that we created in an earlier post. Logical routers consist of two components.  A virtual appliance that is deployed into your vSphere environment.  In the MoaC lab all routers are deployed to our management cluster and the vSphere Kernel module.  Remember the host preparations we performed as part of the NSX installation?  That was installing the NSX kernel modules.

The NSX Logical Routers Perform East-West (VM-VM) routing as well and North-South Routing.  The East-West routing performed by the Logical Routers afford you some extra efficiencies by allowing VM-VM communications across different subnets to happen at the vSphere Kernel when those vm’s reside on the same host.  You can also gain efficiencies when communicating between vm’s on different hosts as well.  Traffic for the communications will traverse host to host instead of needing to go out to a physical router on the network and then to the other vm.  In the post you will witness this as we place a virtual machine on each of the logical switches we created and the Logical Router performs routing between the two networks right in the hosts kernel. Although this specific post focuses on the East-West routing within the Logical Router we will be covering the North-South routing configuration in another post.

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